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Home Forums Sex & Relationships What’s the worst sex advice you’ve ever received??

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 30 total)
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  • #111694
    mak_trouble891
    Participant

    @CookieMonster I totally agree with the icecubes šŸ˜‰ 

    @tea apparently they were told by some older kids, as it had became common practice, which is really sad. Following on from the school sex ed stuff, I totally agree that they are way too heterosexually focussed. I have had a number of high school kids tell me that instead of bananas, the condom demo is done using a dildo and/or plastic fake penis. Not sure how true this is though. 

    #111695
    Aunt_FloAunt_Flo
    Moderator

    Not quite sex advice, but when I asked my GP for my first ever script for the pill, she thought it was a fabulous time to ask, ‘why are girls just giving it away?’ Needless to say I’ve found a much more sex-positive GP!

    #111696
    teatea
    Moderator

    @mak_trouble891 Oh that would be so great if they’re using more realistic props now! Small progress šŸ˜†

    @Aunt_Flo omg that’s terrible, I’m always nervous to see a new GP because of things like this tbh 

    #111697
    peachy
    Participant

    @Aunt_Flo I had a weird experience with my doctor for my first pill script too! She wanted to know whether the person I was choosing to sleep with for the first time was studying or working, whether I saw myself dating him for a while and how long we had been together! Super inappropriate and made me feel so uncomfortable

    #111698
    MintMilanoMintMilano
    Moderator

    @ElleBelle  omg Cosmo advice! I think I read the same thing – using mouthwash before oral sex was another one! Although truth be told I actually tried that with a boyfriend once and the result was surprisingly not bad. Gave the blowjob a little extra sensory tingle! 

    @Aunt_Flo @peachy Obviously those experiences sound awful, but I’m curious, do you think it’s appropriate for GPs to ask at least a few questions to know what’s going on and assess your health? At first I thought so, but then I thought about how no one ever really second guesses young guys trying to get condoms – more often then not it’s “well at least you’re protecting yourself” without any more real guidance or counselling?

    #111699
    MsBlueStreak
    Participant

    @DeftRat I can tell you that my Godson went through his first sex-ed classes (which included practising putting condoms on props) at the end of year 6 – so I think they’re actually trying to teach relevant stuff earlier at the very least.  And I’m told there was a discussion about feelings and knowing when you’re ready, and about the importance of both partners being ready (which I call consent light). I was stoked, his parents were not so impressed because it seems the teachers hasn’t disclosed what would be taught; describing it as “just the basics”.

    @Aunt_Flo that sounds just about as awful as can be – and I’d have given the doctor a piece of my mind about the irrelevance of slut shaming from a medical doctor.

    @peachy I have a sneaking suspicion that your doctor was making a seriously misguided and overly personal attempt to assess if the pill was the right form of birth control for you (as in, if you’re in to casual relationship then perhaps they’d better give you the “condoms are best” speech).

    I had a much better version of that quiz when I first approached a doctor for the pill. They did ask whether I was in a formal relationship, or into a more casual arrangement. They gave me the speech about both partners getting tested, and about using condoms until we were sure. They also noted my acne, and asked if I was interested in dual purpose.

    #111700
    CloakOfAsh
    Participant

    @ElleBelle whats the issue with the ice. can confirm it’s great both ways. Is it the choking hazard?

    #111701
    ElleBelle
    Participant

    I find it incredibly uncomfortable to hold freezing cold icecubes in my mouth for any length of time! Maybe there’s a trick to making it work, I don’t know. Here’s some other ~good~ ones from Cosmo. šŸ˜€

    “As you’re eating dinner together, say something X-rated like,
    ‘See how I’m devouring this piece of meat? That’s how I’m going to
    devour you.'”

    #111702
    MintMilanoMintMilano
    Moderator

    hahah I’ve been hit with “I’m a vegetarian, but don’t worry, I eat meat where it counts  ;)” before  šŸ˜€

    #111703
    HoneyPot
    Moderator
    “I’m a vegetarian, but don’t worry, I eat meat where it counts  ;)”

    Used it.

    #111704
    teatea
    Moderator

    @MsBlueStreak I love when you get GP’s that are chill like that (with not assuming you’re in a monogamous relationship etc)! I had a GP once who asked how I identified and if I was seeing anyone (instead of the usual ‘do u have a boyfriend’), I was so like woah!! cool!!!

    Speaking of Cosmo, did anyone ever read Dolly Doctor back when it was SEALED OFF? I remember shutting myself in my room and feeling so guilty/sneaky tearing into that section. It’s great that they don’t do that anymore though..progress? 

    #111705
    Aunt_FloAunt_Flo
    Moderator

    @MintMilano I think there’s a fine line, but I don’t really see the need for that line of questioning. The doctor could probably just do a general ‘use condoms, get tested’ without prying/being rude. I don’t think there was an excuse for my doctor’s question, though!

    @MsBlueStreak given my time again I would have loved to teach the GP a thing or two about slut shaming! Alas, I was too shocked so I quickly left and called my boyfriend for an angry rant. 

    @tea the sealed section! First thing I would read hahaha.

    #111706
    DeftRat
    Participant

    @MsBlueStreak That’s so awesome that he was being taught that in year 6 (I think). Research is showing that kids are younger when they are starting to have sex so I think getting them going on what to do is such a good thing. But as you said, parents are not always for it, especially when not involved in what’s being taught. I think that a really great way is to engage parents in these conversations to allow them to know what’s going on, and also have some input on what to include

    #111707
    MsBlueStreak
    Participant

    @DeftRat I’m all for the disclosure of what will be taught (parents should know, so they can at least be prepared for the questions that are coming). But not so much on parents getting input into what is included… that’s how much of the US ended up with abstinence only classes. I much prefer the idea that every child get the same information and that it’s all inclusive.

    #111708
    DeftRat
    Participant

    @MsBlueStreak  In an ideal world that would be great if everyone got taught the same things in terms of sex education, but with the political right as they are at the moment this is highly unlikely. There is so much push back, especially with the same-sex marriage survey happening. For everyone to be taught the same things at the moment misses out on a whole lot stuff that I think is extremely important. That’s why I think that if some parents are able to engage with what is being taught and be involved in the conversation then maybe parents would feel like they have more control over it and wouldn’t be so objectionable to what is being taught and maybe even be open to allowing things that they may not have considered appropriate to be taught to their children. I did an essay for uni recently that looked at the involvement of parents in sex education of their children, particularly primary school children, and there was one study that had focus groups for their questions. The parents noted that even being able to talk to other parents about how they approach sex education, what they think is good and bad to be taught was really beneficial for them and allowed them to work through their ideas and apprehensions. Most of the parents also expressed that they wanted their children to have a better sex education than they did growing up, this was across the majority of the studies, so I don’t think there is much of a chance for Aus to end up with abstinence only programs like the US. Obviously there are going to be some strict parents out there, but I think conversations between schools and parents and even community organisations around sexual education in schools is important to provide thorough and effective education for kids. So maybe not so much let them have input, but allow them to be a part of the conversation about the sex education that their kids are going to be getting.
    (Sorry for such a long post)

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